Other Marine Life

 

Photographs

Note: From this page, the orange-red link under each photograph and in the Table of Contents will take you to a full-size photo.  If there are any additional images, an asterisk (*) will follow the orange-red link and take you to a full page for the species.  Alternatively a the photo below is linked to either the full-sized photo or the full page for the species as well. 

Other Marine Life Currently within this WWW Site – 38

     Alphabetical List by Common Name

     Alphabetical List by Genus and Species

     Alphabetical List by Family

 

Barnacle of the Balanidae Family (1)

Titan Acorn Barnacle, Megabalanus coccopoma. Size: 10 cm (4.0 inches) x 10 cm (4.0 inches) x 13 cm (5.1 inches). inches). A shallow water species found in all Mexican oceanic waters. They date to the Oligocene period, 4 million years ago.

Barnacle of the Lepadidae Family (1)

Goose Barnacle, Lepes anserifera*. Length: 3.8 cm (1.5 inches). Barnacle in first photo collected well off-shore on floating debris and second photo is of a cloister of barnacles that had been removed from a plastic one gallon jug that had washed ashore. Both collected in the greater Los Cabos area, Baja California Sur.

Bristle Worm of the Amphinomidae Family (1)

Common Fireworm, Eurythoe complanata*. Maximum length: 35 cm (14 inches). Fairly abundant component of tidal pools in the greater Los Cabos area, Baja California Sur. Will generate severe pain upon touching. Pictured worm length: 15 cm (5.9 inches).

Heart Urchin of the Spatangidae Family (1)

Keeled Heart Urchin, Brissus latecarinatus. A Maximum length: 20 cm (7.9 inches). Found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific. Historically important in human commerce. Pictured urchin: 15.0 cm (5.9 inches) x 13.4 cm (5.3 inches). Identification courtesy of Christine Ewers, Athens, GA.

Hydrazoa of the Porpitidae Family (1)

Vellella, Vellella vellella. A form of jellyfish found on the oceans surface, collected from coastal waters off Ensenada, Baja California. Length: 2.5 cm (1.0 inch). Collection, photo and identification courtesy of Chris Wheaton, Fullerton, CA.

Krill of the Euphausiidae Family (1)

North Pacific Krill, Euphausia pacifica. Length: 1.5 cm (0.5 inches). Common and found in schools of 2 million tons with 1 million animals per cubic meter. Consumed by seabirds, rays, and whales at a level of up to 300 million tons per annum.

Mantis Shrimp of the Squillidae Family (2)

Sorcerer Mantis Shrimp, Squilla biformis. Length: 16 cm (6.2 inches).  Deep water species. Males are larger and outnumber females. Abundant being found at the southern end of Baja and along the coast of the mainland. A frequent catch of deepwater trawlers.

Tiburon Mantis Shrimp, Squilla tiburonensis. Length: 10 cm (3.9 inches). Mantis shrimp are reported to be the fastest animals on the planet (yes, even faster than Usain Bolt!).

Nudibranchs of the Chromodorididae Family (2)

Ghiselin Chromodorid, Hypselodoris ghiseliniLength: 5.1 cm (2.0 inches).  Very common under tidal pool rocks in low surge zones along the coasts of Baja California Sur.

Sedna, Glossodoris sedna. Length: 3.0 cm (1.2 inches).  Found under tidal pool rocks in low surge zones along the coasts of Baja California Sur.

Nudibranch of the Pleurobranchidae (1) Family

Orange Blob, Berthelina ilisima. Length: 3.0 cm (1.2 inches). Found under tidal rocks in the low surge zones along the coasts of Baja California Sur.

Octopus of the Octopodidae Family (1)

California Two-spotted Octopus, Octopus bimaculoides. Caught by hook and line from 200-foot coastal waters off Loreto, Baja California Sur. Length: 20 cm (7.9 inches).

Sea Cucumbers of the Holothuridae Family (3)

Bottleneck Sea Cucumber, Holothuria impatiens. Length: 15 cm (5.9 inches). Maximum length: 30 cm (12 inches). Fairly common in the tidal pools of the greater Los Cabos area, Baja California Sur.

Giant California Sea Cucumber, Parastichopus californicus. Length: 15 cm (5.9 inches). The largest sea cucumber on the Pacific coast. Maximum length: 40 cm (16 inches); 5 cm (2.0 inches) in width. Maximum weight: one-half pound. Commercially important.

Leopard Sea Cucumber, Holothuria pardalis*. Length: 13 cm (5.1 inches). Maximum length: 15 cm (5.9 inches). Fairly common in the tidal pools; common, present in all Mexican waters of the Pacific.

Sea Lion of the Otariidae Family (1)

California Sea Lion, Zalophus californianus, male. Sexually dimorphic. Males: length: 2.4 meters (7 feet 8 inches); Weight: 350 kg (770 pounds). Females: length: 1.8 meters (5 feet 11 inches); Weight: 100 kg (220 pounds). Least Concern. Photo taken at Punta Lobo, Baja California Sur.

Sea Turtle of the Chelonioidea Family (1)

Pacific Black Sea Turtle, Chelonia agassizii. Maximum length: 84 cm (33 inches). Endangered.

Seal of the Phocidae Family (1)

Harbor Seal, East Pacific Subspecies, Phoca vitulina richardii. Length: 1.85 meters (6 feet 8 inches). Weight 132 kg (290 pounds). Known also as the Common Seal and one five subspecies with global populations estimated to between 350,000 and 500,000.  Abundant in coastal waters off La Lobera, Baja California. Photo and identification courtesy of Chris Wheaton, Fullerton, CA.

 

Slipper Lobsters of the Scyllaridae Family (2)

Rock Slipper Lobster, Scyllarides astori. Length: 38 cm (15 inches). Maximum length: 46 cm (18 inches). A resident of the Sea of Cortez.

Shield Fan Lobster, Evibacus princeps, juvenile. Length: 5.0 cm (2.0 inches). Maximum length: 35 cm (14 inches). A resident of the Sea of Cortez.

Spiny Lobsters of the Palinuridae Family (3)

Blue Spiny Lobster, Panulirus inflatus*. Length: 36 cm (14 inches).  Very common along the west coast of the Baja and caught in abundance in lobster traps and sold commercially.

Green Spiny Lobster, Panulirus gracialis. Length: 31 cm (12 inches).  Less common along the west coast of the Baja and caught in lobster traps and sold commercially.

Red Spiny Lobster, Panulirus penicillatus. Length: 36 cm (14 inches).  Wide global distribution and present along coastal mainland Mexico but uncommon along the west coast of the Baja and caught in lobster traps and sold commercially.

Squid of the Loliginidae Family (1)

Market Squid or Opalescent Inshore Squid, Doryteuthis opalescens*. Length: 14 cm (5.5 inches).  The number one cut bait for bottom fishing.  Readily available at most of the major food stores in Mexico.

Squid of the Ommastrephidae Family (1)

Humboldt Squid, Dosidicus gigas*. Length: 2.7 meters (8 feet 10 inches).  Weight: 50 kg (110 pounds). The most cunning and ferocious of all animal on planet earth.  Readily available at most of the major food stores in Mexico. Marginal cut bait for bottom fishing.

Starfish of the Asteriidae Family (1)

Sunflower Star, Pycnopodia helian-thoides*. Maximum wingspan: 90 cm (35 inches); maximum weight: 5.0 kg (11 pounds). They begin life with 5 arms but arms are added until they have up to 24 arms. Possess up to 15,000 tube feet allowing them to travel at speeds of up to 9-feet per minute.  Voracious predators. Their Mexican range is limited to the extreme northwest coast of Baja. Pictured stars wingspan: 15 cm (5.9 inches).

Starfish of the Asterodiscididae Family (2)

Horrida Spiny Sea Star, Paulia horrida*. Maximum wingspan: 18 cm (7.1 inches). They are found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific with the exception of waters north of Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur and the northern Sea of Cortez. Pictured stars wingspan: 13 cm (5.1 inches). Exceedingly rare. Identification courtesy of Dr. Chris Mah, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.

Insignis Spiny Sea Star, Amphiaster insignis*. Maximum wingspan: 18 cm (7.1 inches). They are found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific with the exception of waters north of Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur and the northern Sea of Cortez. Pictured stars wingspan: 12.5 cm (4.9 inches). Exceedingly rare. Identifica-tion courtesy of Dr. Chris Mah, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.

Starfish of the Astropectinidae Family (3)

Channeled Sea Star, Tethyaster canaliculatus*.  Maximum wingspan: 50 cm (20 inches). They have a wide distribution being found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific with the exception of the central and northwest coasts of Baja. Pictured stars wingspan: 16 cm (6.3 inches).

Fragile Sand Star, Astropecten fragilis*.  Maximum wingspan: 25 cm (10 inches). They have a wide distribution being found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific. Arms have wide bases that acutely taper being about 6.5 times longer than the disc radius. Pictured stars wingspan: 19 cm (7.5 inches).

Peruvian Sand Star, Astropecten peruvianus*. Maximum wing-span: 27 cm (11 inches). Collection from the southwest coast of Baja. Previously unknown to Mexican water. Pictured stars wingspan: 27 cm (11 inches).

Starfish of the Asteropseidae Family (1)

Keeled Starfish, Asteropsis carnifera*Maximum wingspan: 25 cm (10 inches). They have a wide distribution being found throughout the Sea of Cortez and along the coast of the mainland. Pictured stars wingspan: 15 cm (5.9 inches).

 

Starfish of the Heliasteridae Family (1)

Gulf Sun Star, Helister kubiniji. Wing-span: 15 cm (5.9 inches); maximum wing-span 30 cm (12 inches). Characterized by having 19 to 25 legs. Found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific.

 

Starfish of the Mithrodiidae Family (1)

Bradley’s Sea Star, Mithrodia bradleyi*. Maximum wingspan: 35 cm (14 inches). Rare and poorly studied.  Pictured stars wingspan: 22 cm (8.7 inches).

 

Starfish of the Ophidiasteridae Family (1)

Tan Starfish, Phataria unifascialis*. Maximum wingspan: 30 cm (12 inches). Fairly common in the tidal pools of the greater Los Cabos area, Baja California Sur. Pictured stars wingspan: 15 cm (5.9 inches).

Starfish of the Oreasteridae Family (1)

Chocolate Chip Star, Nidorellia armata*. Maximum wingspan: 15 cm (5.9 inches). They are found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific with the exception of waters north of Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur. Pictured stars wingspan: 15 cm (5.9 inches). Identification courtesy of Dr. Chris Mah, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.

Whales (Baleen) of the Balaenopteridae Family (2)

Blue Whale, Balaenoptera musculus. Length: 29.9 meters (98 feet); Weight: 181 tons (400,000 pounds); Life Span: 80 to 110 years. Endangered. The largest known inhabitant of planet earth. Abundant in coastal waters off Loreto, Baja California Sur, during the months of January, February and March.

Gray Whale, Eschrichtius robustus, mother with new born. Length: 14.9 meters (49 feet); Weight: 36 tons (80,000 pounds); Life Span: 55 to 70 years. Critically Endangered. Abundant within Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur, during the months of January, February and March.